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at 1441 stockton street. to the previously approved conditional use authorization in march, 2007, it operates as a retail bookstore with a limited restaurant component known as a. cavalli & co. it acquires a conditional use to expand. the department has received one additional comment with concerns alleging the business' continued violation. the department has not found the business to be in violation of the conditions of approval based on site visits conducted by the enforcement staff in response to each complaint. elimination of the bookstore and expansion of the restaurant will not result in the loss. the project will not affect the concentration of eating or drinking establishments. the business will not serve alcohol for on-site consumption and the project will enable locally owned and operated businesses to continue serving the north beach community. based on these findings, the department recommends you approve the project with conditions. that concludes my presentation and i am available for questions. thank you. >> president fong: project sponsor? >>: good afternoon com
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
. the question in conditional use how do you determine who is a good project sponsor? >>: our process is not comfortable. is long and expensive. by the end of it we know who the operators are. to the uncomfortable process a relationship is formed. this is not a huge bureaucracy that we are dealing with. four people. if somebody walks in and we know, oh, that's that guy who runs that place we say so. >> commissioner borden: is there a basis on which you cannot issue a permit? >>: spelled out. this goes back to the first-- our permits are "shall grant", you shall grant if abc -- our processor design for compliance, not designed to keep people out or punish people. it frustrates the heck out of sfpd and neighbors. >> commissioner borden: the question that comes up sometime is, if someone wants the permit they go through the process, they can get it and it doesn't matter what their history is barring criminal activity. >>: i would not underestimate the importance of the sfpd entertainment commission informal powers. and the conditions attached to a permit. with specific cases like the
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by lea
do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles definitely need to be treated
. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esoteric in its term but on the ground how do you operationalize it, those things in the public school who are working so hard to meet the required mandates. schools are driven by mandates, academic achievement, achievement, enrollment. but the conditions in which the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and
think the commission as part of its previous approval stated that some of us interested to see the final fa├žade design to be reviewed by some of us. i have not had the opportunity to follow up with staff. those commissioners who want to be involved should continue to do so. i want to restate the continued interest of some of us to participate in the final configuration. >>: anyway. to staff, in terms of the one-year permitting trigger, with respect to the building permit, is there a specific permit that is referenced? can they go in for a site permit and that counts? >>: the first construction permit in this case is -- >>: in this case it would be the architectural addenda. >> commissioner antonini: i moved to approve, the required action must contain (indiscernible) >>: second. >>: on that motion: >> commissioner antonini: aye >> commissioner borden: aye >> commissioner hillis: aye >> commissioner moore: aye >> commissioner sugaya: aye >> commissioner wu: >> president fong: aye it passes unanimously, 7-0. we do have a member of the entertainment commission here, for item 13, enter
significantly. i used to get two calls a week of people complaining about the bylaw, i don't get any of it now because we're able to defuse it by telling them about the support programs. i've been talking all afternoon. we also offer two mural programs, one that we fund ourselves directly and one that we offer community groups $2,000 to paint murals in the community. the idea is that that program is a matching program so community groups can match up to $2,000 with any type of community effort so they can get an artist to donate the art work, you can get somebody to donate paint, their volunteer hours count against the matching, so all of that is helpful in terms of getting them going. and what we really found is that some groups will use the two thousand and spend 12,000 on doing a mural. the best one i've seen, we had a high school do two dugouts that were constantly being hit, it cost them $750 and we have no problem with the dugouts any more. public awareness, we have a very, very substantial public awareness campaign. we have media support from all of our local radio, television and
and in each of the domains think of something in all of them in the last 24 hours that you had to use, that you had to activate in relationships with the co-workers or spouses and these are different life skills and there is the area of responsible decision making and comes into play when you have to figure out what to do when you have a problem, so you can probably just look at that and "oh yes, i see where the connections would be" and i would like to kind of point out because we are talking about bullying today -- one of the things i love -- i don't know if rosylyn is still in the room but she talked about a specific example. this is an example of what a teacher should be able to do if she sees something in the hallway and described this whole process and when i was listening to that i was thinking oh my gosh in every category that person would have to be very socially emotionally competent. you need the awareness to know something is going on. you need that empathy to compel you do something about t you need the management skills to approach that situation calmly and not be ove
to build something. also, we have a rock piece of land. we have to have a resolution. >> in the u.s., about 2/3 of the population lives in areas that are prone to landslides. about $2 billion of damage occurs annually from landslides. unfortunately, 20-25 million people die as a result of landslides o. >> much of the coastline is either a bright red or a beige print th. >> here we are at the base of telegraph hill on lombard street. this is owned by the city. behind you is a large piece of something exposed. you are looking at a large class that was xextricated in a quarry about hundred years ago. this is a secretive sandstones, shales, accumulated debris. essentially it ended up piled up here. the quarry activity was so intense and they used some much at dynamite that the kind of over blasted. 10 feet of the face was left shattered. you can see the fresh colors and a pile of debris which is precariously perched on the edge of a cliff up there. it is more fresh and more recent than the rest. it stands out because there's no vegetation. there is no weathering of material. those are the kinds
behavior. anita shows distribution, most of us in here. you get anybody out here who is externalizing or anyone out here who is internalizing, as a psychologist, we try to bring them back in here so they're more healthy. that's what we study. when you're having problems in your life or any other area, if we can do something, talking to you versus talk therapy or medicine that might help you, what we're trying to do is get everybody back here so we're just kind of more balanced. with respect to the traumatic brain injuries and other types of things, that's much simpler for people to kind of understand that you had a concussive event or you had a t.b.i., traumatic brain injury, that's caused problems. we should be developing ways of helping to manage and treat those problems just like we do individuals who have the other types of problems. >> let me just add one thing there, which is it's a good question, but it highlights one of the challenges of introducing neuroscience today in the courtroom. at kent showed you some of his slides and mentioned during his talk, he is trying to develop
in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal justice system? to date, we haven't. in the future, we may wish to. >> i agree with tha
english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the
district use legislation. very briefly i did want to state that the sud is contingent on the lease negotiations that the mta is conducting with the owner of 1741 powell. the negotiations are going. our requested for a continuance of one week. >> president fong: additional public comment on the two items proposed for continuance? >>: my name is richard hamlin longtime resident of north beach. i want this project very much. extraction down at the pagoda and perhaps someday having a station there. >>: -- we submitted a legal letter to the planning commission. -- opposes and objects to the extraction at the pagoda and zoning map amendment and special use district on the grounds of this project is obviously very different from the original project that was approved in the eir by example the geotechnical engineers letter included in the package points out the very high water table and the de-watering and pressure on adjacent buildings not evaluated on a previous eir. also,-- >>: this public comment is only to the continuance itself. >>: should i make comments during the general commen
, and the very strategies that allow us to take into consideration. but the most important part of it is the beginning, acknowledging the trauma that could have happened in that person's life. and dr. gillece, how do we screen for that? well, i think when you do trauma-informed care, i think what's really important too is to create environments of care that do no more harm. there are many different screenings that we can use for trauma. but i think, then, it's really important for those systems to be prepared to do something about it once we screen. can you tell us a little bit about which ones we're using? well, there's many different. there's many, many different trauma screens. we used to use everything from brief trauma screens to the ace study to short screens that are used to try to not retraumatize-for example, in jail-that just may ask four or five questions. so, there's many, many trauma screens that are very good and excellent for use. and what type of questions are they, for example? well, some questions are like, for the brief ones that we have used in prisons and ja
, u.s. department of health and human serviceses, rockville, m; dr. maxine harris, ceo and co-founder, community connections, washington, dc. dr. clark, what is trauma and how do we define trauma? the definition of trauma is a little ambiguous, but it's tied to specific adverse events that a person may experience or a community may experience, including disasters, physical or sexual abuse, or witnessing the above-mentioned. it's of that nature, it could be psychological as well as physical, and there are a wide range of issues associated with the definition. very good, and what are the various sources of trauma? well, the sources are similar to the precipitant. it could be from a relative or a partner. it could be in war, from the enemy. it could be from tornadoes or hurricanes or floods. it could be from predators who are in the community unbeknownst to the victim, a person who's victimized from either physical assault or rape or events like that. so the, it can be from a loved one or it can be from a total stranger. dr. gillece, basically how is trauma closely tied with subs
and esther solar for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to speak with you about it. the origin is that as the united states attorney, the administration wants me, wants all the united states attorneys, to go out into the community. it's actually a very different role for the unite
to my knowledge. the cost is far from being cost effective. using the pagoda as central subway corporation yard if you will, raise the building, put a shaft down, is fraught with instruction problems due to the water flow problem in the basement pointed out by letter from sav e muni. there are lower cost alternatives. unless this information we don't know about % leave the tunnel-boring machines buried, under the pagoda theatre or extract them from the chinatown station. extracting them or burying them at chinatown would save 80 million dollars. by doing that it would not impact the people, residents, businesses of north beach. when you consider the use of this building for an extraction site it should be denied. i think it is an expensive project. it is disruptive. there are a lot better alternatives. thank you for your time. >>: and if further general public comment? seeing none general public comment is closed. >>: this will place you under your regular calendar. items 10 a-c have been continued to feb. 14. items 4 and 5 have been pulled. >>: request from commissioner
. proposition c is becoming increasingly important for us. the first thing we have is the financing memo which shows that we went out with a 12 percent affordable. 48 affordable units and 351. based on that financing we got some proposals from lenders the most .serious one was prudential. -- -0 what we have is we have something, the formal appraisal that prudential authorized had that as part of their basis. next, we went and got it formal commitment from prudential on december fourteenth; we got a 90-day locked rate. right now we have a 142 million dollar with a lock that expires on march 14. it is expressly conditioned on getting prop c approval. the next document is a letter from -- and material consideration of pmc underwriting the loan is inclusion of affordable housing. key assumption is the 12% affordable. boy, am i nervous. sorry. finally, with regards to prudential there is the actual construction loan agreement. i have not included the whole thing. page 59 of that expressly once again says that this loan is absolutely conditional on the prop c approval. finally, in your package w
to use an example that might seem a little far-flung for that question. one of the things i wanted to talk about with colleagues is the write up process when they cuss you out in the classroom or the hallway. i was in chicago in may and already the strike talk was coming up and talking to some of the teacher. one of the teachers said i don't know what to do about this bullying thing because the kids are cussing me out in the hallway and all i can do is write them up. i think that's a moment i'd like us to think about in terms of empowerment of the teacher. it might be the case that the teacher doesn't feel for a lot of different reasons that she can't depend on his principal to back her up and maybe that principal their best, too. but one of the things i want us it look at in terms of treating children with dignity, which means they are worthy, two things. respect as a word is overused in schools and if i could frankly take down all of the banners of in schools that say you have to respect yourselves, i would. because i think that kids see that and they think that what we do i
happened in that neighborhood to pop it back up. so it's allowing us to look neighborhood by neighborhood to look at the community enforcement officers woork they are doing there so next year when we go to do a hire, our bylaw officers are working with revitalization, i'll be sharing this information with them to say these are the key neighborhoods you need to be in touch with as well as the different constables and beat officers to say, look, this is a problem and this is what's trending in your neighborhood. so it's been very beneficial to us in terms of how we deploy our resources. five neighborhoods accounted for 46 percent of the graffiti vandalism observed in 2012. even though i showed you in that last slide that downtown is decreasing, it still is one of our most significant neighborhoods as far as graffiti. queen mary park. those 5 neighborhoods within the exception of one, have remained fairly consistent from the beginning of the program. although the percentage of how much graffiti they have has gone down. what we're finding, too, is that while the reduction in the graffiti ove
to eradicate bullying from schools at the 2012 con conference of mayors. he is here today to address us on the vexing issue of bullying. it is my pleasure to introduce the mayor of san francisco, ed lee. . >> thank you, ann, for that wonderful introduction and i don't know where you got the ease of coming to the mayor's ofrs, there was no ease on that. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for joining together here at the presidio with all the different agencies. i see phil ginsburg, i know bill is around, others from our da office, richard caranza and others from the women's status as well and the district attorneys from the various counties, the school administrators and instructors and superintendents from other counties as well, as well as our community-based agencies that are so invaluable it all of us. this is a very important topic and it's one that our u.s. attorney, melinda hague and i helped spearhead yesterday with 800 students who came together who watch an incredible film by lee hirsch i've heard the wonderful reports from the kids, seen their laughter and their tears. we are
to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human part, that is the part that should have consequences and not be ignored. otherwise the legislation really isn't doing what it's supposed to do, so thank you all very much. i really give a shout out to san francisco unified because they have been very, very on top
's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans right now and suicide is complex and we cannot send the message -- there is a lot of fear out there right now that bullying leads to suicide and suic
through the use of twitter, through the use of other social media. we did a case, again a hate crimes case involving an individual who called himself devilfish who over the internet was sending death threats to the heads of the national council of irasa to other organizations that had the audacity to october on behalf of immigrants. and we prosecuted him. you described one just now, that is not an isolated incident. you know that old addage, sticks and stones can break my bones but words can never hurt me, i categorically reject that. we have seen kids quite literally take their own lives as a result of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise.
here to give you the we the report. i want to start with land-use committee on january 28. the land-use committee had an amendment to the code commonly called the condo-lottery ordinance, sponsored by supervisor farrell and cosponsored by supervisor wiener. i would like to give you a quick overview of the law. it is limited to no more than 200 conversions per year through a lottery process. to qualify occupants must live in the unit for more than three years. the 2012-13 lottery participants can bypass the 2014 lottery if they pay a $20,000 fee. a reduction of the fee by 20% for every year the building has participated in the lottery but has not been successful. where tenants to take the opportunity of a lifetime lease additional refunds can be granted. this is a basic summary of the proposal. supervisors farrell and wiener expressed their concern about opportunities for homeownership in the city in this ordinance represents a reasonable balance of goals increasing homeownership by increasing tenant protection with lifetime lease. the lottery bypass is around a decade only. sorry,
diversity but also celebrate the things that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no, but, but, so we are not funding or digging into can urriculum in that way. but you certainly have seen superintendent caranza happened about what happens with the kinds of conversations that happen with the movie bully and there are can urriculum packages being developed. i had visions, gary, to think about how if folks decided -- and we don't play in this -- but if folks decided there could be a class on this, how you teach, life skills class, right? if we try to make a one-size fits all click approach that doesn't really take people from where they are and get them to where they need to go. i have seen life skills work well and i have seen students literally filling out mcdonald's applications in their life skills class. so you can't just quickly eradicate and we can't just think about this in an isolated silo the link, fo
the bullying takes place begins to change and it's not acceptable so we use a combination of hard power and soft power. >> jeff thank you. [applause] two to three minutes goes really fast and that was a little over, just fyi. superintendent. >> don't start the clock yet. thanks. again i want to thank everyone for being here this morning and this morning i said "welcome to a sunny day in september" and many of you didn't believe me and i want to thank you all for being here and in my comments at the beginning i spoke of the wonderful experience and having 3,000 opportunities yesterday see "bully" the movie. i spoke of all of the administrators seeing "bully" when they came back from summer break and develop their plans on their campuses here, so i would like to go deeper and talk about a couple of things and before that i appreciate what rosylyn and the previous panel said about the term "bullying" and run the risk of it meaning something generic and meaningless and the word of the day, so let's talk about what it is. it's assault. sometimes it's aggravated assault. it's kidnapp
on any page, and they can come right to us, but we've invented this thing, which is not the most brilliant invention but working well and the social resolution way to solve bullying and other harassing content, so we created a flow where you could say "hey, i don't like that piece of content" and instead of reporting to facebook ink and we have 3,000 people but we don't understand the context of everything going on. you can report to a family or friend or somebody off the site. >> in the context -- >> in the context of the behavior itself. we have seen the reports go down. the closing of the reports go up and when we surveyed the people both the person reported and the person reporting -- not everyone, but most of the people were very satisfied how it resolved itself. now just think about that. somebody said -- so it's like i say to anne "anne nice shirt. nice jacket. >> but you hate it. >> and i hate it or maybe i don't. i'm giving a complement. the thing is facebook inc. doesn't know the context but now we have a system in place and i can resolve to anne and anne could
. i am done. that was his turning point. call it a turning point, called the teachable moment. use whatever terminology that you want. that is where we need to be present. when i say we, i mean, we. at that turning point, at that moment of truth, that teachable moment, it is imperative that resources be brought to bear. now, what are the two most impressive resources that are brought to bear at that moment. there are two major forces that helped gang members change. one of them is tattoo removal. this is the first major force in the denunciation. the second is legal assistance. surprising. you did not see this on the video and i never thought of this. the first thing individuals need, not to feel like gang members -- is to erase their past. they have literally talked with me about feeling -- removing these tattoos and legal excitement. it is not that simple. changing from being a gang member to a former gang member involves a change in identity. this is a tricky process. it is slow and steady, and there is frustration. the gang is replaced with drugs, and there are fallbacks. relap
. in dealing with the violent us youth, they need to make them understand that they have done something, there will be repercussions, there will be consequences. they will have to serve their time, but not get lost in the shuffle. prison can have two or facts. it can make someone want to be more productive member of society or they can become more integrated into the gang lifestyle. these individuals can go in and aligned with these groups and now they come out and they are more respected in the community in the wrong aspect and they're going to do something more severe. we need to -- was these people go to prison, do not lose touch with them. meet them when they are being sentenced. >> i love something you just did. you said "he needs to" and a new corrected yourself and said "we need to." we need to be thinking along those lines. you are basically out of prison, correct? you have grown up in richmond, an area that is labeled gang infested. when you listen to this, how do each of you react? what do think of what he is saying? could you work with him? it's tough love be answered? -- it'
is here, rob, could you come on up, rob neighbor, please join us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. families will testify it continues. it hits the community and now we have to continue to pull ourselves up and help our other daughter and the challenges of raising and parenting another child. you know, we can't just pull up in a shell. she has the right to have a childhood. she deserves to go to go to c
and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it was not a choice. this is just how was. let's go get him. and it comes to the place, you get tired of running. i did not see this as being wrong. what people defined as a gang, that must be a gang member right there. i have tattoos on my arm and neck and hand, and none of them are getting associated. they all tell personal story in my life. somebody would say that this is a gang memb
. joining us in our panel today are dr. joan gillece, project director and principle trainer, samhsa national center for trauma-informed care,
torrez to join us again on stage, joaquin will be introducing the mayor and if i can ask my fellow committee members to also join us on stage. joaquin. >> thank you very much i have to say as director the mayor's oches of neighborhood services it's refreshing to have a mayor so dedicated to couldn't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now
on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank
advocate for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention. thank you for that focus too and i think that gentleman has comments. >> i was going to follow up in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatev
's stuff out there for the graffiti vandal because that can be of huge use to you. meetings, we hold a monthly task force meeting and our task force meeting pretty much covers everything from santa barbara down to san diego is our main group we have a task force meeting with. we share ideas, it's evolved over the years, become more formal. now each time we have a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for abo
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